ATLANTA’S LIVING LEGACY

A History of Grady Memorial Hospital and Its People

ABOUT THE BOOK

The first comprehensive history of Grady hospital and its impact on Atlanta, this lively and richly illustrated volume explores the history and meaning of Grady Memorial Hospital from its founding in the late nineteenth century into the first years of the twenty-first century.

More than a biography of a major institution, this book offers a fresh and surprising story about health care in Georgia, a story that helps us understand what happens when politics and public health are (and when they aren’t) joined at the hip.

In this sweeping history, Dr. Martin Moran examines what Atlanta’s public hospital has meant for its people and their area. Grady’s story includes a remarkable roster of physicians, nurses, patients, politicians, teachers, philanthropists, and civic leaders.

Dr. Moran shows how its character as a public institution has shaped Grady’s development. Its status as a teaching hospital has meant that its story has been intimately interwoven with those of the Emory University School of Medicine and the Morehouse School of Medicine.

For more than a century, competing public and private interests, conflicting dreams, and outside political interference often turned Grady into a focal point for debates about taxes, civic responsibility, race relations, the role of government, and visions of healthcare.

Book cover

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Martin Moran, M.D., majored in history at the University of Arizona and earned his M.D. from the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in 1963. He is the author of Tincture of Time: The Story of 150 Years of Medicine in Atlanta, 1845-1995, serves on the board of the Atlanta Medical History Society, and has served as the editor of Atlanta Medicine, The Journal of the Medical Association of Atlanta, and the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia. He is also the editor of a children’s book, The Town Turtles of Sandy Springs. He served for five years in the United States Army (1964-1969) reaching the rank of major. He then practiced pediatrics in Sandy Springs, Georgia, a suburb of Atlanta, from 1969 to 2000.